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Can Tomato Plants Survive Winter? How to Grow Tomatoes Year-Round

by Webb Gardner
This article was fact checked.
Helpful: 100%

Tomatoes are one of the most popular and versatile crops to grow in the home garden. They can be eaten fresh, cooked, canned, dried, or frozen for later use. But what if you want to enjoy fresh tomatoes in the winter, when the weather is too cold for them to grow outdoors? Is it possible to grow tomatoes in the winter, and if so, how?

The answer is yes, you can grow tomatoes in the winter, but you will need to take some extra steps and provide some special care for your plants to survive.

In this article, I’ll show you three clever ways to grow tomatoes in the winter, and share some tips and tricks for success. Whether you want to extend your tomato season, start your plants early, or grow tomatoes indoors, we have you covered.

How to Grow Tomatoes in the Winter

There are three main ways to grow tomatoes in the winter: growing specialized varieties, growing tomatoes indoors, and growing in a greenhouse. Let’s look at each of these methods in more detail.

Grow Specialized Varieties

a cold variety of red tomatoes, can tomatoes survive the winter

Some tomato varieties are more cold-tolerant and have a shorter season than others, which makes them suitable for growing in cooler climates and seasons. These varieties can withstand temperatures as low as 50°F (10°C) and produce fruit in as little as 52 days.

Some examples of these varieties are:

  • Cold Set: A determinate variety that produces medium-sized, red tomatoes in 65 days. It is resistant to verticillium and fusarium wilts.
  • Glacier: A determinate variety that produces small, red tomatoes in 55 days. It is cold-hardy and early-maturing.
  • Golden Nugget: A determinate variety that produces small, yellow tomatoes in 60 days. It is sweet and prolific.
  • Northern Delight: A determinate variety that produces medium-sized, red tomatoes in 65 days. It is early and reliable.
  • Oregon Spring: A determinate variety that produces large, red tomatoes in 58 days. It is cold-tolerant and low-acid.
  • Siletz: A determinate variety that produces large, red tomatoes in 52 days. It is early and disease-resistant.
  • Valencia Heirloom: An indeterminate variety that produces medium-sized, orange tomatoes in 76 days. It is rich and flavorful.

To grow these varieties, you will need to start them indoors about 6 to 8 weeks before your last frost date, and transplant them outdoors after the danger of frost has passed.

You will also need to provide them with adequate sunlight, water, fertilizer, and support. You can also protect them from frost by covering them with cloches, row covers, or plastic sheets at night.

Grow Tomatoes Indoors

Another way to grow tomatoes in the winter is to grow them indoors, where you can control the temperature, light, and humidity. This can be done in several ways, such as:

  • Growing tomatoes in pots or containers: You can use any pot or container that is at least 12 inches in diameter and has drainage holes. You can fill it with a good potting mix and plant one tomato plant per pot. You will need to place the pots in a sunny window or under artificial lights, and water and fertilize them regularly. You will also need to stake or cage the plants to support them. You can choose smaller or dwarf tomato varieties that are more suitable for indoor growing, such as Cherry Gold, Red Robin, Small Fry, Tiny Tim, Toy Boy, and others.
  • Growing tomatoes in a hydroponic system: You can use a hydroponic system that delivers water and nutrients to the roots of the plants without soil. You can buy a ready-made hydroponic kit or make your own with a reservoir, a pump, a timer, a growing medium, and a nutrient solution. You will need to place the system in a sunny window or under artificial lights, and monitor and adjust the pH, water level, and nutrient concentration. You can choose any tomato variety that you like, but indeterminate varieties may need more pruning and training to fit the space.
  • Growing tomatoes in an aeroponic system: You can use an aeroponic system that sprays water and nutrients to the roots of the plants without soil or growing medium. You can buy a ready-made aeroponic kit or make your own with a reservoir, a pump, a timer, a misting nozzle, and a nutrient solution. You will need to place the system in a sunny window or under artificial lights, and monitor and adjust the pH, water level, and nutrient concentration. You can choose any tomato variety that you like, but indeterminate varieties may need more pruning and training to fit the space.

Grow Your Tomatoes in a Greenhouse

The third way to grow tomatoes in the winter is to grow them in a greenhouse, which is a structure that traps heat and creates a warm and humid environment for the plants. A greenhouse can be made of glass, plastic, or other materials, and can be of various sizes and shapes.

You can buy a ready-made greenhouse or build your own with a frame, a cover, and a ventilation system. You will need to place the greenhouse in a sunny location, and provide heating, lighting, and watering as needed.

You can choose any tomato variety that you like, but you may need to pollinate the flowers by hand or with a fan, as there may not be enough insects or wind in the greenhouse.

Tips and Tricks for Growing Tomatoes in the Winter

Here are some tips and tricks to help you grow tomatoes in the winter successfully:

  • Choose the right variety for your method and climate. Some varieties are more cold-tolerant, early-maturing, or compact than others, which can make a difference in your yield and quality.
  • Start your seeds indoors at the right time. You don’t want to start them too early or too late, as this can affect their growth and development. A general rule is to start them 6 to 8 weeks before your last frost date, or 8 to 10 weeks before you plan to transplant them outdoors or in the greenhouse.
  • Harden off your plants before moving them outdoors or in the greenhouse. This means gradually exposing them to the outdoor conditions for a few hours a day, increasing the time and intensity each day, until they are ready to be planted. This will help them adapt to the change and avoid shock and injury.
  • Provide adequate light, water, fertilizer, and support for your plants. Tomatoes need at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight or artificial light per day, regular watering to keep the soil moist but not soggy, balanced fertilizer to provide nutrients, and stakes or cages to support their stems and fruits.
  • Protect your plants from frost, pests, and diseases. You can use cloches, row covers, plastic sheets, or other materials to cover your plants at night or when the temperature drops below 50°F (10°C). You can also use organic or chemical methods to prevent and control pests and diseases that may affect your plants, such as aphids, whiteflies, spider mites, blight, wilt, and others.
  • Harvest your tomatoes when they are ripe and enjoy them fresh or store them for later use. You can tell when a tomato is ripe by its color, firmness, and aroma. You can pick them when they are fully ripe or slightly underripe, depending on your preference. You can eat them fresh, cook them, can them, dry them, or freeze them for later use.

Also Read: What To Spray On Tomato Plants To Keep Bugs Away? Now Answered

a man standing in a row of pots that are growing tomatoes in a greenhouse during the winter

Why Grow Tomatoes in the Winter?

There are many benefits of growing tomatoes in the winter, such as:

  • You can enjoy fresh, homegrown tomatoes all year round, even when they are out of season and expensive in the market.
  • You can save money and reduce food waste by using your own tomatoes instead of buying them.
  • You can choose from thousands of tomato varieties that have different shapes, sizes, colors, and flavors, which you may not find in the supermarket.
  • You can control the quality and safety of your tomatoes by avoiding pesticides, herbicides, and other chemicals that may be used on commercial tomatoes.
  • You can have fun and satisfaction from growing your own food and harvesting your own tomatoes.

Conclusion: Tomatoes Over Winter

Growing tomatoes in the winter is possible and rewarding, if you follow the right steps and provide the proper care for your plants. You can choose from three main methods to grow tomatoes in the winter: growing specialized varieties, growing tomatoes indoors, and growing in a greenhouse.

Each method has its advantages and disadvantages, and you can choose the one that suits your needs and preferences. By growing tomatoes in the winter, you can enjoy fresh, homegrown tomatoes all year round, and reap the benefits of growing your own food.

Let me know in the comments if you’ve done it before!

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